Fear of Falling

Posted by on Jan 13, 2019 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Did you know that falling injuries are some of the most common injuries across the United States? And that there are at least 424,000 deaths related to falling?  Not all falls are fatal, but most cause some form of life debilitating injury.

Car accidents have even scarier statistics.  You have a 1/77 chance of dying in an automobile accident at any given moment in time and this can increase in likelihood given the situation.  There’s so much that could go wrong, but you don’t think about it until something does.

I never would have thought that I’d be the type of person to get into an accident.  To be fair, they can happen to everyone, but I really didn’t think it would happen to me.  I’m so careful about everything that I do. I never considered myself to be the type of person that would be in this type of situation, that would have to contact a lawyer because of an injury.

After doing the research, I realized that I was more at risk than I realized and that there are a lot of circumstances where you might need an attorney. If you’ve experienced bike accidents, car accidents, complications due to medicine, a slip or fall, or even a dog bite, you will probably need an attorney to make sure that you receive compensation.  It was overwhelming to see how much preparation and evidence was needed even for an accident as small as mine, especially since I was trying to recover. Part of me even thought about throwing in the towel and not pursuing a case at all.

That was before I stumbled across the Glover Law Firm.  They were able to talk to me almost instantly about the specifics of my case – for free.  Immediately, it felt like a burden was lifted off of my shoulders. I thought I was going to have to sacrifice even more time and energy, time that I should have spent healing, but the Glover Law Firm made sure that I had nothing to worry about.  They worked for me so that I could focus on what really matters after my accident.

Even said, at the beginning, I might have been like you – hesitant and confused.  When you’ve never had to handle law before, it can be difficult to nowhere to start or even who to trust.  I felt much better about trusting Attorney Gordon J. Glover after I realized how qualified he really is. He graduated from the University of Florida and for the past fifteen years has been helping people all over The Village area.  His work has made him one of the Top Rated Injury Lawyers, and he has a perfect Avvo 10 rating. After viewing his credentials, I knew there was no one better suited to help me with my case.

I know the time after an accident is a scary and confusing time – but it doesn’t have to be.  If you let the Glover Law Firm take care of you, you could end up like me: satisfied and on the road to recovery.

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Burglary: Debunking the Common Misconception

Posted by on Jun 24, 2018 in Criminal Defense Law | 0 comments

When we hear burglary, we think of someone breaking into someone’s house and stealing something. However, as this article by Bruno Law Offices explains, burglary does NOT require any breaking and entering. Nor does it mean a theft has to occur. As the article explains, burglary means knowingly trespassing on someone’s property with intent to commit either a theft or a felony. Thus, breaking and entering isn’t required. The trespass portion of the definition means that someone could enter another person’s property unlawfully, or it means that someone can remain on someone else’s property longer than they are supposed to.

Consider this example to illustrate the trespass portion of the definition of burglary. Suppose John walks into a Home Depot at 8:00 PM, which is one hour before the store closes at 9:00 PM. He plans to hide in the store, wait for it to close, and then when no one is around, he plans to take a power drill. As you can see, there is no breaking and entering involved. In fact, John lawfully entered the Home Depot. However, because he stayed longer than he was lawfully allowed, he satisfies the trespass portion of the above-mentioned definition of burglary.

Additionally, note that the definition of burglary does not require that someone steal something after the trespass. Rather, they must have the intent to commit either a theft or a felony. So, the usual example of someone that breaks in and enters some building to steal something falls within this definition, but it also includes much more conduct.

For example, suppose John knowingly trespasses onto someone else’s property and then intends to commit an aggravated assault, and eventually he does commit the aggravated assault. While John stole nothing, he still had the intent to commit a felony. This would satisfy the second portion of the above-mentioned definition of burglary.

Another interesting thing to note about the definition of burglary is that it only mentions the intent to commit a theft or felony. It does not require the actual carrying out of the theft or felony. It only specifies the intent. This intent is also required upon the unlawful entrance of the property. So, if the intent to commit theft or felony comes way after the unlawful trespass, this may not constitute burglary as defined above. However, intent can be very tricky to prove in a court of law, because it is tough to get in someone’s mind.

As you can see, burglary, as defined by the helpful article written by knowledgeable Champaign theft and burglary lawyers, does not only include the individual that breaks and enters a home to take some item. While this type of conduct is included under the umbrella of burglary, burglary covers much, much more. All in all, there are three main points that make burglary unique: the trespass requirement, the intent requirement, and the theft or felony requirement.

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Tips for Employees Losing Out On Overtime

Posted by on Sep 30, 2017 in Unpaid Overtime Claims, Unpaid Overtime Claims Attorneys | 0 comments

The problem with employers manipulating wages is larger than many people realize. Though we all understand the concept that anything over 40 hours should mean “time and a half” (or 1.5 times your normal wage), there’s a growing problem with employers trying to game the system so they don’t have to pay the extra money.

It’s important, as employees, to be aware of how your employer might mess with your hours so you can be on guard against it and make sure you get all the money that is coming to you. Take a look at these 5 common tricks employers use so you’ll be ready if any of them are tried on you.

  1. They call you an “independent contractor” when you aren’t one – Independent contractors are a special type of worker who can control their hours, where they work, and can sell their services to multiple employers. If all those qualifications don’t apply to you, you aren’t an independent contractor, and you deserve to get your overtime.
  1. They put you on a low salary – Just because you get a salary doesn’t mean you can’t get overtime. If your salary is less than $2,000 a month, contact someone to find out if you are still entitled to earning overtime.
  1. They make you clock out early – This is an old trick. If you have a meeting at work, you should be clocked in. if your boss wants to chat about your performance, you should be clocked in. if you are held over with work at lunch, you should be clocked in. If your boss is finding excuses to get you clocked out, you should be paid that money back, and if that puts you over 40 hours, you should be getting overtime.
  1. They average your hours – This one is a little more technical, and also a lot more malicious. According to the attorneys of the Leichter Law Firm, your employer is not allowed to spread your hours out over the whole pay period. How some employers do this is they move your overtime hours to a week when you worked less than full-time. Say you had to miss work for a day last week and this week you worked five hours of overtime. So, your boss wants to take those five hours and put them last week so you don’t get any extra pay. That’s illegal. Don’t let them get away with it.
  1. They “comp” your hours – Another of the more technical tricks of the cheating boss trade. Your boss may be taking your overtime and putting it toward future time off. This is perfectly legal in the public sector, but it isn’t if you’re an employee at a private (non-governmental) business.

It’s important to keep an eye out for these and other possible issues with your employer when it comes to your income. If you look at your paycheck and something doesn’t add up, start looking more closely and ask for more information.

If your boss is doing any of these things, you need to know that the law is on your side. If when confronted, your boss continues these practices and doesn’t pay you back what is owed, it may be time to contact a lawyer.

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Just How Useful is a Self-storage Unit?

Posted by on Jun 13, 2017 in Self-storage Unit | 0 comments

Beginning in 2004, the average size of houses in America became bigger – from 1,660 square feet to 2,400 square feet, according to the National Association of Homebuilders. Despite having become bigger, most of these newly designed structures lost one very useful area, where house owners can store their old valuable belongings – the attic or the basement (this is especially true in Sun Belt states, like, Florida, California and Texas, where houses, especially the newly-built ones, are designed without either an attic or a basement).

Now, with consumerism in America on the rise again, the number of people needing extra space has also risen. But since many houses no longer come with an extra storage room, many find that extra space elsewhere – in self-storage facilities.

There are more than 50,000 self-storage facilities in the U.S. and most of these are located in Sun Belt states. The purpose of a self-storage, or mini-storage, is to provide individuals, families or businesses the extra space they need practically for anything they need to store safely.

Though the idea of renting a self-storage may be a very remote idea to others, those who are currently leasing one know that having a self-storage space can really be beneficial, especially if you:

  • Want to enjoy the freedom of being able to rotate your furnishings regularly;
  • Intend to move to a new residence;
  • Need to reduce some of your furnishings for more excellent showing; and,
  • Lack space for old things that cannot be thrown away, such old toys or your parents’ favorites.

A self-storage can be leased on a month-to-month basis; lease can be renewed, though. Besides being affordable, payment can also be cash, with a personal check or through a credit card. Self-storage facilities also give assurance that your belongings will be safe and accessible to you 24/7.

Not all storage facilities offer the same features. You may want to prefer a facility that not only has customer service that can answer your queries anytime and address your concerns efficiently, but also has a resident manager, who can guarantee order and safety and, most of all, one that features:

  • A drive up access;
  • A personal access codes
  • Security cameras;
  • A fully-fenced property;
  • Affordable rates on all storage units; and,
  • Climate-controlled and ground level units (keep your important items regulated and secure).

There are self-storage units, by the way, for those intending to store only boxed and other “not-so-big” items, and there are big units as well where one can keep furnishings from an entire home.

 

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The Dangers of DUI

Posted by on Apr 3, 2017 in DUI | 0 comments

The Dangers of DUI

Driving under the influence of alcohol, or more commonly known as DUI, is against the law. But there are drivers out there who still risk driving while intoxicated, maybe because they have no choice but to drive home by themselves, do not fear the consequences, or both. To prevent drunk driving, it is important to know its dangers first.

You can get arrested

Since DUI is illegal, you can get arrested and suffer the penalties for it, such as fines, license suspension, vehicle confiscation, installation of restrictive devices such as an ignition interlock, and even jail time. DUI convictions are worse than you think. The license suspensions, vehicle confiscations, and ignition interlocks will limit your mobility. Having DUI records also don’t sit well with businesses and employers.

According to the website of this Lee County DUI lawyer, it is possible to defend DUI charges. But if you ask me, prevention is still better than cure.

You can crash

There is a reason why drunk driving is considered an offense. Alcohol can affect your ability to drive. Physically, you may lose control of the vehicle because of your limited body coordination. Mentally, you may fail to comprehend traffic lights and road signs. This means that you are at risk of crashing your vehicle and injuring not just you, but also your passengers.

You can collide with other people on the road

Remember that you are not the only vehicle on the road. Your limited physical and mental abilities not just give you the risk of crashing, as it also gives you the risk of colliding with another vehicle or another person on the road.

Getting involved in an accident is one of the most tragic things that can happen to a person who is diligently driving his vehicle, safely riding his motorcycle or bicycle, and being careful in crossing the road. If that person has sustained an injury, he may even have enough grounds to take you to court.

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