Why Pedestrian Accident Victims should Seek Compensation

The National Safety Council (NSC) says that there are about 70,000 pedestrians accidents in the US every year; 4, 500 of these accidents are either fatal or end in the victim’s death a few days after the accident (the NSC is a a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, nongovernmental public service organization that promotes health and safety in the US by helping minimize the alarmingly high number of preventable injuries and deaths in working environments, homes and communities).

Pedestrians accidents resulting to death are more frequent in rural areas where vehicles run faster, where there are usually no sidewalks where pedestrians can walk safely, and where most streets and intersections are poorly illuminated at night. One common factor in fatal pedestrians accidents, however, is intoxication; it could either be an intoxicated driver or a pedestrian who has drank more than his of her limit.

Pedestrians is, and shlould be, a major concern for everyone, for the simple reason that everyone is a pedestrians at certain times of the day. While drivers play a major role in significantly reducing incidences of pedestrian accidents, pedestrians themselves should never exercise lesser care when crossing any street.

According to the Schuler, Halvorson, Weisser, Zoeller & Overbeck, P.A. law firm, even minor accidents can result in serious injuries, and ongoing pain and suffering that would leav accident victims with serious emotional, psychological, and financial burdens. To make matters worse, those who have to contend with these serious side effects often did nothing to cause the accident.

Most non-fatal pedestrian accidents result in serious injuries, like broken bones, spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injuries or accidental amputation. Due to the serious condition a victim may end up in, filing a civil or tort lawsuit against the at-fault driver often becomes necessary, mainly for the purpose of seeking compensation for all present and future damages resulting from the injury.

Money will never undo the trauma and injuries suffered by the victim; it can, however, help him or her pay for the costly medical treatment which may help bring back the quality of his or her life.